Upcoming Programs

 

To see the Getting to Zero: New York + Waste Spring/Summer program schedule click here.

 

Photo by Robin Nagle
 

New York City's Dis-Contents: A History of Waste Systems
SVA Theatre, Manhattan
Monday, May 1, 2017
6:30 PM (Doors Open) / 7:00 PM (Presentation)

Getting New York City’s garbage where it’s going has always been a massive and complex challenge. While the story of New York is often told through its captains of industry, artists, and politicians, the story of the people who have handled its waste is uniquely revealing in what it tells us about how the city has evolved to support such a dense concentration of life.

In the city’s early days, New Yorkers dumped their waste into the rivers to create new land, taking the idea of hyperlocal waste management to the extreme. Today, in our highly industrialized consumer society, we produce vastly larger quantities of garbage per capita than we did in the past, but we send it all to distant landfills hundreds, or even thousands of miles away. Eliminating our reliance on a landfill-based system is critical, but to truly become a zero waste city, New Yorkers will need to re-think the systems of production and consumption that gave rise to it.

On May 1st, join us for a talk by NYU professor and DSNY anthropologist-in-residence Robin Nagle, author of Picking Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of New York City, to learn about the evolution of the city’s waste infrastructure over the past four centuries: where we’ve sent our waste, how it got there, who carried it away—and how it could change.

Registration
Free for OHNY Members and Volunteers
$5 Students / $10 General Admission
Reservations are required as space is limited

Not a member? Click here to see a full list of benefits and join today!

REGISTER TODAY

This program is part of Getting to Zero: New York + Waste, a year-long series of tours and talks exploring New York City's waste system.

Please note: This event is fully accessible.

 


 

Recent Programs

 

Photo courtesy of Materials for the Arts
 

Getting to Zero: Materials for the Arts
Long Island City, Queens
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
6:00pm

Materials for the Arts is a program of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs, with support from the Departments of Sanitation and Education, that collects unneeded materials from businesses and individuals -- everything from office furniture to arts supplies -- and makes these donations available for free to nonprofits, government agencies, and public schools. Based out of a sprawling warehouse in Long Island City, MFTA diverts over 1 million pounds of materials a year from the waste stream to help enrich New York’s arts and creative community.

Join us for a tour of the warehouse to learn about how the program works and about the importance of reuse centers in a zero waste city. The tour includes a special viewing of “ Institutional Memory: 35 mm Slides from the Met’s Collection Reimagined,” a new exhibition of work created entirely from the recently digitized slide collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, with work created by artists Martina Mrongovius, Michael Kelly Williams, Andrea Wolf, and Dustin Yellin. The tour will be followed by a discussion with wine and light refreshments.

Open House New York thanks Materials for the Arts for making this tour possible.

This tour is part of Getting to Zero: New York + Waste, a year-long series of tours and talks exploring New York City's waste system.

 


Photo by Dan Lucal
 

Getting to Zero: Goodwill NYNJ + Big Reuse
Astoria, Queens
Wednesday, April 12, 2017
10:00am

We throw away huge quantities of objects and material long before the end of their useful lives. From t-shirts and toys to lumber and light fixtures, reuse will be a fundamental part of life in a zero waste city. 

Along the industrial waterfront of Astoria, Queens, two adjacent facilities present very different models for how reuse centers can contribute to their communities, as well as the city at large. This tour will visit Goodwill Industries’ regional hub for the NY/NJ area to learn about how the organization’s famous thrift stores support its robust slate of job training and youth education programs.

Then, we’ll cross the street to the sprawling warehouse operated by Big Reuse (formerly Build It Green NYC) and see how one of the city’s largest thrift stores has supported the development of a number of new forms of reuse activity, including a commercial compost operation and a sawmill that processes reclaimed lumber from across the area—including the city’s thousands of rooftop water tanks.

Open House New York thanks Goodwill Industries of Greater New York & Northern New Jersey and Big Reuse for making this tour possible.

This tour is part of Getting to Zero: New York + Waste, a year-long series of tours and talks exploring New York City's waste system.

 

Photo by Naomi Castillo
 

Getting to Zero: Treasure in the Trash at the M11 Garage
East Harlem, Manhattan
Sunday, March 26, 2017
Tours at 11am and 1pm

Over the course of more than three decades, DSNY sanitation worker Nelson Molina rescued tens of thousands of objects from the garbage of his upper Manhattan route, creating one of the world’s largest known collections of material reclaimed from the trash.

Now installed in an astonishing "museum" display on the second floor of the M11 garage in East Harlem, the collection serves as a profound commentary on waste and consumption. To see this sprawling collection in person is a visceral experience that challenges our understanding of how we think about and categorize objects as "waste."

Two tours of the Treasure in the Trash collection will take place as part of Getting to Zero. Please note that, while Nelson Molina will be on-site throughout to answer questions and speak with attendees, tours are self-guided.

Open House New York thanks the NYC Department of Sanitation (DSNY) for making this tour possible.

This tour is part of Getting to Zero: New York + Waste, a year-long series of tours and talks exploring New York City's waste system.

 

Image Courtesy of MCR Development LLC
 

Projects in Planning: TWA Hotel at JFK Airport
SVA Theatre, Manhattan
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
6:30 PM (Doors Open) / 7:00 PM (Presentation)

Open House New York invites you to a presentation about one of the most eagerly anticipated projects in New York City: the transformation of the TWA Flight Center at JFK International Airport into the TWA Hotel. The TWA Hotel will celebrate and preserve Eero Saarinen's masterpiece and reopen it to the public for the first time in many years. It will include 505 guest rooms; 50,000 square feet of conference, event, and meeting space; a 10,000-square-foot roof deck; 8 food and beverage outlets; and an innovative museum showcasing New York as the birthplace of the Jet Age.

Presenters will include Tyler Morse, CEO and Managing Partner, MCR Development LLC; Richard Southwick, Partner and Director of Historic Preservation, Beyer Blinder Belle; Anne Marie Lubrano, Founding Principal, Lubrano Ciavarra Architects; and Jim Steven, Manager, JFK Physical Plant and Redevelopment for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Projects in Planning is a series of OHNY programs that explores the design and planning process of a single project during its early stages of development and construction. Projects in Planning is made possible with sponsorship support from

 


Photo by Daniella Shin

 

The Future of Waste in New York
A Lecture by Kathryn Garcia, Commissioner, NYC Department of Sanitation​
Followed by a conversation with Kate Ascher

SVA Theatre, Manhattan
Tuesday, February 21, 2017
6:30 PM (Doors Open) / 7:00 PM (Lecture Begins)

We are excited to announce that Kate Ascher, author of The Works: Anatomy of a City, will join Commissioner Garcia after her lecture for a conversation about the future of the city's waste infrastructure.

With the release in April 2015 of the OneNYC Plan, the City of New York laid out an ambitious goal: to reduce to zero the amount of waste that New York sends to landfills by 2030. Like all cities, New York manages a complex system of waste collection, transportation, and disposal -- a vast physical infrastructure that keeps our neighborhoods healthy and thriving.

Open House New York announces Getting to Zero: New York + Waste, a yearlong series of tours and public programs that will explore New York's waste infrastructure. How have changing approaches to waste management shaped and reshaped the city over time, and what possibilities might a radical shift in the amount of trash we produce, and how we dispose of it, have for our neighborhoods and the future of the city? Read more about Getting to Zero.

To launch this major new initiative, Open House New York is honored to host a lecture by Kathryn Garcia, Commissioner, NYC Department of Sanitation (DSNY). Commissioner Garcia will outline the steps that New York has already taken toward becoming a zero waste city, the opportunities and challenges we will face over the next few years, and innovative practices that have the potential to transform the waste management industry.

 


Image courtesy of DLANDstudio

 

Projects in Planning: QueensWay
SVA Theatre, Manhattan
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
6:30 PM (Doors Open) / 7:00 PM (Presentation)

Open House New York invites you to a presentation about the plans to transform an abandoned rail line in Central Queens into the QueensWay, a new 3.5-mile linear park, with Susannah Drake, Principal, DLANDstudio; Andy Stone, Director of the New York City Program at The Trust for Public Land; and Travis Terry, Steering Committee Founding Member, Friends of the QueensWay.

Located on an abandoned stretch of the LIRR Rockaway Beach Branch, the QueensWay will include biking, jogging, and walking paths and will create a link to Forest Park for thousands of Queens residents from six underserved neighborhoods. Once completed, the 47-acre park will also feature upgraded facilities for local little leagues, schools, and neighboring communities.

Projects in Planning is a series of OHNY programs that explores the design and planning process of a single project during its early stages of development and construction. Projects in Planning is made possible with sponsorship support from